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Welcome to Sofitel London St James

Address: 6 Waterloo Place, Piccadilly Circus, SW1Y 4AN

Hotel Description

In London's West End, this 5-star luxury hotel is set in a beautifully preserved Victorian building. It boasts a luxurious on-site spa, spacious rooms, and an award-winning brasserie restaurant. On the corner of Pall Mall and Waterloo Place, Sofitel London St James is a 15-minute walk from Buckingham Palace. Piccadilly Circus and Charing Cross Station are 5 minutes’ walk away. St James’s Park is just 300 metres from the hotel. Each elegant room boasts an iPod dock and LCD interactive TV. Bathrooms feature walk-in showers, bathrobes and slippers, and luxury toiletries. Some rooms include fantastic London views. Sofitel’s So FIT gym is fully equipped and provides bottled water, fresh fruit, and toiletries. Guests can also make use of the gym’s own personal trainers. The Sofitel So SPA provides luxurious and innovative spa treatments over 3 floors with original historic features. With its own entrance on Pall Mall, The Balcon brasserie serves French-British cuisine. The elegant Rose Lounge serves traditional afternoon teas, and the St James Bar offers cocktails and champagnes.

Our Facilities

  • Restaurant
  • Bar
  • Laundry Service
  • Massage

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Attractions - Sofitel London St James

The Cenotaph - Whitehall - Landmark

The Cenotaph - Whitehall - Landmark

Distance 0.32 miles (0.5 km)
The War memorial, known the world over as The Cenotaph, is situated in London's Whitehall; it was originally built of wood and plaster, for the first anniversary of the armistice in 1919. The memorial you see today was designed by Edward Lutyens and was created from Portland stone, the inscription simply reads "The Glorious Dead"; it was unveiled one year later in 1920. On the Sunday nearest to 11th November at 11.00am each year, a remembrance service is held here, to commemorate the British Empire and Commonwealth servicemen, who died in the two world wars. The Monarch, representatives of the Church, state, the armed and auxiliary forces, gather to pay respect to those who lost their lives, defending the freedom of others. Hymns are sung, Prayers are said, and the two minute silence is observed; then wreaths of Poppies are laid on the steps of the cenotaph.

Charing Cross Railway Station - Railway Station

Charing Cross Railway Station - Railway Station

Distance 0.32 miles (0.51 km)
London Charing Cross station is a central London railway terminus which is unusual in that its train services directly connect to two other railway termini; Waterloo and London Bridge. The station takes its name from the Charing Cross district of London, which itself is named after the twelfth Eleanor cross, which stands in front of the station. The cross marks the point from which all UK road distances from London are measured, so the station can claim to be the most central in London. The front of the station faces onto The Strand. Recently, in 1990, most of the rear of the station was covered by Embankment Place, a post-modern office and shopping complex designed by Terry Farrell and Partners.

Apsley House - London - Country Home

Apsley House - London - Country Home

Distance 0.44 miles (0.7 km)
From April 2004, English Heritage has been given responsibility for the care and presentation of Apsley House. Home to Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington, and his descendants, this internationally important property has for over 200 years been known colloquially as No 1 London, as it was the first house to be encountered after passing the tollgates at the top of Knightsbridge.

The Banqueting House - Whitehall Palace - Country Home

The Banqueting House - Whitehall Palace - Country Home

Distance 0.46 miles (0.74 km)
The Banqueting House, opposite Horse Guards Parade, is the sole surviving complete building of Whitehall Palace, the sovereigns principal residence until the reign of William III.The Palace was built by the renowned 17th century architect Inigo Jones for King James to hold state occasions including masques, plays and state banquets and was once one of the largest palaces in Europe. Sadly, the majority of the palaces buildings were lost in the devastating fire of 1698.

Buckingham Palace - London - Landmark

Buckingham Palace - London - Landmark

Distance 0.58 miles (0.92 km)
Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain's sovereigns since 1837 and today is the administrative headquarters of the Monarch.
Although in use for the many official events and receptions held by The Queen, the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace are open to visitors every year. For visitor information, please visit the Royal Collection website.
Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms. In measurements, the building is 108 metres long across the front, 120 metres deep (including the central quadrangle) and 24 metres high.
The Palace is very much a working building and the centrepiece of Britain's constitutional monarchy. It houses the offices of those who support the day-to-day activities and duties of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh and their immediate family.
The Palace is also the venue for great Royal ceremonies, State Visits and Investitures, all of which are organised by the Royal Household.
Although Buckingham Palace is furnished and decorated with priceless works of art that form part of the Royal Collection, one of the major art collections in the world today. It is not an art gallery and nor is it a museum.
Its State Rooms form the nucleus of the working Palace and are used regularly by The Queen and members of the Royal Family for official and State entertaining.
More than 50,000 people visit the Palace each year as guests to banquets, lunches, dinners, receptions and the Royal Garden Parties.
For those who do receive an invitation to Buckingham Palace, the first step across the threshold is into the Grand Hall and up the curving marble stairs of the Grand Staircase. Portraits are still set in the walls, as they were by Queen Victoria.
The Throne Room, sometimes used during Queen Victoria's reign for Court gatherings and as a second dancing room, is dominated by a proscenium arch supported by a pair of winged figures of ' victory' holding garlands above the 'chairs of state'.
It is in the Throne Room that The Queen, on very special occasions like Jubilees, receives loyal addresses. Another use of the Throne Room has been for formal wedding photographs.
George IV's original palace lacked a large room in which to entertain. Queen Victoria rectified that shortcoming by adding in 1853-5 what was, at the time of its construction, the largest room in London.
At 36.6m long, 18m wide and 13.5m high, the Ballroom is the largest multi-purpose room in Buckingham Palace. It was opened in 1856 with a ball to celebrate the end of the Crimean War.
It is along the East Gallery that The Queen and her State guests process to the Ballroom for the State Banquet normally held on the first day of the visit.
Around 150 guests are invited and include members of the Royal Family, the government and other political leaders, High Commissioners and Ambassadors and prominent people who have trade or other associations with the visiting country.
Today, it is used by The Queen for State banquets and other formal occasions such as the annual Diplomatic Reception attended by 1,500 guests.
This is a very formal occasion during which The Queen will meet every head of mission accredited to the Court of St James's. For the diplomats it is perhaps the highlight of the annual diplomatic social calendar.
The Ballroom has been used variously as a concert hall for memorial concerts and performances of the arts and it is the regular venue for Investitures of which there are usually 21 a year - nine in spring, two in the summer and ten in the autumn.
At Investitures, The Queen (or The Prince of Wales as Her Majesty's representative) will meet recipients of British honours and give them their awards, including knighting those who have been awarded knighthoods.
From the Ballroom, the West Gallery, with its four Gobelin tapestries, leads into the first of the great rooms that overlook lawn and the formal gardens - setting for the annual Garden Parties introduced by Queen Victoria in 1868.
The State Dining Room is one of the principal State Rooms on the West side of the Palace. Many distinguished people have dined in this room including the 24 holders of the Order of Merit as well as presidents and prime ministers.
Before the Ballroom was added to the Palace in the 1850s, the first State Ball was held in the Blue Drawing Room in May 1838 as part of the celebrations leading up to Queen Victoria's Coronation.
The Music Room was originally known as the Bow Drawing Room and is the centre of the suite of rooms on the Garden Front between the Blue and the White Drawing Rooms.
Four Royal babies - The Prince of Wales, The Princess Royal, The Duke of York and Prince William - were all christened by the Archbishop of Canterbury in the Music Room.
One of its more formal uses is during a State Visit when guests are presented to The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh and the visiting Head of State or for receptions.
The last of the suite of rooms overlooking the gardens on the principal floor is the White Drawing Room. Originally called the North Drawing Room, it is perhaps the grandest of all the State Rooms. The Room also serves as a Royal reception room for The Queen and members of the Royal Family to gather before State and official occasions.
The Bow Room is familiar to the many thousands of guests to Royal Garden Parties who pass through it on their way to the garden. It was originally intended as a part of George IV's private apartments - to be the King's Library - but it was never fitted up as such.
Instead, it has become another room for entertaining and is where The Queen holds the arrival lunch for a visiting Head of State at the start of a State visit.