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Welcome to Cromwell Hotel Stevenage

Address: High Street, Old Town, Stevenage, SG1 3AZ

Hotel Description

Once a farm house and home to John Thurloe, secretary to Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell Hotel Stevenage combines modern décor with original features and free high-speed WiFi. The hotel is close to the A1(M) and just 10 minutes’ drive from Knebworth Park. All rooms include a private bathroom and hairdryer. Rooms also feature a TV, tea/coffee making facilities, and a work desk with lamp. Room service is also available. Oliver’s Restaurant offers a range of dishes from its menu with a good wine selection. The hotel’s bar and lounge areas offer drinks and bar food in relaxed, informal surroundings. Free parking is available, and Duxford Imperial War Museum is a 30-minute drive away. Woburn Abbey and Woburn Safari are both 45 minutes’ drive from the hotel. The hotel offers discounted rates for a local leisure centre, located on a leisure park just a few minutes away.

Our Facilities

  • Restaurant
  • Bar
  • Laundry Service

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Attractions - Cromwell Hotel Stevenage

Knebworth House - Historical Houses

Knebworth House - Historical Houses

Distance 2.78 miles (4.45 km)
The Lytton family have lived at Knebworth for 500 years. Queen Elizabeth 1 stayed here, Charles Dickens acted in private theatricals in the House and Winston Churchill's painting of the Banqueting Hall hangs in the room where he painted it. A walk through the House is a walk through history. Robert Lytton, Viceroy of India, proclaimed Queen Victoria Empress of India in 1877. Constance Lytton, militant suffragette, fought for votes for women in the early 1900s. Originally a red-brick Tudor manor house, it was transformed in 1843 into the Gothic fantasy we see today, with turrets, griffins and gargoyles. Interior rooms contrast the Gothic works of John Crace with the 20th Century designs of Sir Edwin Lutyens and other eras.